How is Hanoi Vietnam compared to your hometown

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How is Hanoi Vietnam compared to- your hometown?
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Well, Hanoi just Hanoi with hoe roaming around like Chinese catfish and my hometown just like my hometown with the exception we don’t have hoe roaming around like 5 o’clock Chinese catfish her. U ???? hear

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My hometown is now Paris. I would not mention difference due directly to the climate. There a lot of differences and I can only report the most striking in my sense:

A lot of high rises condominiums built lately.

Shopowners consider the pavement as their shop floors. Repair workshops, hardware workshops…operate in the street: dangerous.

Disregard for pedestrians. Disregards for traffic rules. And the cops just don’t care about the offenders.

Little or no street crimes.

The old quarters are just overpopulated.

Public loudspeakers everywhere, broadcasting propaganda, local news, reminders to the local population about their duties…they work everyday from 7:15…such an annoyance.

Hanoians wake up very early for their gym: you can see them as early as 4:30 AM.

Public libraries are rare.

Healthcare might be cheap but substandards: local hospitals just consider strangers as cashcow , and their doctors are underqualified.

Waterways in the city are heavily clogged with garbage people carelessly dump in.

Inhabitants are overly supertitious.

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I’ve been hopping around the US and Mexico (now Vietnam) for 71 years….I really don’t have a “home town”.

That said, I feel comfortable in Hanoi and Vietnam. The govt doesn’t hassle me. The police are a fairly passive bunch….not aggressive at all. The people are nice. Lots to see and do in and near Hanoi. Nearby Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia, Thailand, China and other countries are relatively cheap and accessible to travel to. Hanoi, HCMC, Bangkok all have big international airports with flights to everywhere. Cost of living is very affordable. Health care is surprisingly good…certainly better than I expected. And, comparatively, very modestly priced. Lots of restaurant choices. It’s a different culture than US or Mexico. They do things differently. I embrace the differences, I do not criticize them.

I do not comment on Vietnam politics at all. Ever. I’m a guest in this country, I try to act like a guest, Driving here is a “challenge” to put it mildly. IMO, Vietnamese is a difficult language to learn.

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My hometown is Danang, a major city in Vietnam’s South Central Coast.

Hanoi is much bigger than my town

Hanoi is surrounded in all direction by a populous rural area. Danang is also surrounded by the countryside, but only to its Western and Southern sides, to the North and the East of the city is the South China Sea. The rural area surrounding Danang, despite being one of the most populous in Central Vietnam, is still much more sparsely populated than the area around Hanoi.

The climate in Hanoi is more extreme than that in Danang. In summer it’s hotter in Hanoi than it is in Danang. And Hanoi also has a long, chilling winter while Danang has a relatively short, mild one.

Being a bigger city equals offering more opportunities. Hanoi’s economic scene is more vibrant than Danang’s.

Hanoi is also the bigger industrial centre, as a result, it’s also more polluted than my hometown.

Hanoi is much older than Danang. A city was founded in modern-day Hanoi under Second Chinese domination of Vietnam in the 5th century AD, while Danang, as a city, was founded in the 17 century.

Hanoi is more conservative, my hometown is more liberal (just as any Southern Vietnamese city).

People in Hanoi speak the Northern Vietnamese dialect. In Danang, we speak a variation of the Southern dialect. The two dialects are mutually intellegible.

That’s all I can think of right now :)

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New York City, my hometown, is a new city by historical standards. The central borough, Manhattan, was designed as a grid, for the most part. Hanoi reflects its ancient roots with winding pathways interconnecting vestiges of ancient villages.

Food! Ah, Vietnamese food, can one find a better place than Hanoi?

Actually, you can find authentic ethnic food of all descriptions in New York, especially Vietnamese food. I am afraid Hanoi, while trying and developing, has not yet perfected the reciprocal. HCMC is winning on that account. There are more places to find good Western food in HCMC. Although one finds the best bread in Asia in Hanoi, a vestige of the French I suppose.

I was recently talking with a guy at a restaurant in Bangkok. My new friend spoke English with a thick Russian accent. When I asked him where he was from, he responded: “New York”.

People from around the world find their way to New York City. Once they live there for a while, they are New Yorkers.

I will never be Hanoian, ever.

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My hometown is Haiduong, the middle between Hanoi and Haiphong. If you have a chance to visit Long Bien bridge, catch a train to Haiphong in Long Bien Railway Station, you will then be able to visit Haiduong.

In Vietnam, when we come to the age of 18, we take the national exams to universities. We will be graded, I meant, the grades will decide which university we will go to later. And as usual, people go to Hanoi (the capital) or HCM city for higher education. That is why Hanoi is always crowded. Younger generation, every year.

Haiduong is not crowded like the capital, and somehow, not developed like Haiphong - the land of ports and sea. It is small, quiet and gentle. I can bet that except for Danang, Haiduong is the best place for people to settle down. I meant, for those who want to live in an old province that is not too busy.

Well, Haiduong is not as polluted as Hanoi. And the people are friendlier and more gentle than in Haiphong.

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