What is bean spouts role in Vietnamese food?

0 votes

What is bean spouts’ role in Vietnamese food? Is it a must?

asked in Culture, Living by

9 Answers

0 votes

Bean sprouts are often added for textures. They have very little taste. As far as them being a must , I’m going to venture to say no. I cannot say doubtlessly, but from what I do know, they are not in every Vietnamese dish.

Thank you for the a2a!

answered by
0 votes

Not very much. Bean sprouts are a must for several dishes, but still several others need none of them. What you can be sure is that sprouts are dropped in most of the popular dishes: noodles, pho, banh xeo, goi cuon, bun bo, canh chua (sour soup)

answered by
0 votes

Bean sprouts in Vietnam is only popular in the South.

The South Vietnamese use it in some of the dishes that require raw vegetables. When the North Vietnamese see it in a Pho soup, it's a surprise to them. The bean sprouts in the Pho would dilute the soup flavor. I love quick stir fried beansprouts.

But it is not a “must”.

answered by
0 votes

It’s a popular ingredient in many Vietnamese dishes. It makes the broth to be sweeter and more flavor, but it’s just like a high recommendation for you to have a tasty dish. You can ask to skip it in your own dishes if you don’t enjoy its taste, a lot of my friends do that also and it seems like they are good without spouts.

But if you don’t have any problem with spouts, I think you should keep that in your dishes, at least in ‘Pho’ because it will make your bowl of ‘Pho’ become much more delicious. I hope you enjoy Vietnamese food.

answered by
0 votes

Depends on what you're having. You do not eat rice dishes or spring rolls with bean sprouts and/or lime but rather with fish sauce and or maybe a little hoisin sauce. Usually for anything that's soup-based or broth-based, then you add bean sprouts and/or lime, hoisin sauce,basil, mint, etc… for flavor. Hoisin is not Vietnamese, it is a Cantonese word meaning seafood. You will not see hoisin sauce in really authentic Vietnamese food in Vietnam. Hoisin sauce was imported from China or Hong Kong to the USA. Most of the people who opened Vietnamese restaurants were initially Nguoi Hoa, a Chinese ethnic minority group from Vietnam, then later on Vietnamese restaurants were opened by Vietnamese people, then much much later on, most Vietnamese restaurants were opened by Taiwanese people. For summer rolls there's a special hoisin sauce plus peanut butter dipping sauce. You do not eat this with bean sprouts or other ingredients normally associated with Vietnamese food.

There is also chili peppers and Sriracha sauce you can add on the side in Vietnamese restaurants among other condiments.

answered by
0 votes

no, not a must.

It is commonly seen in Vietnamese dishes tho. It is fresh and juicy and mixed well with ingredients.

Good if cooked with pork, beef, green vegetables, soup, noodles.

I think the reason for its common usage is that bean sprouts absorpt favour well. It lightens the odd smell of animal meat, neutralize any over-salty or over-heated components. It even absorpts fat, I think.

answered by
0 votes

I wouldn't say it's a must, but I'm kinda disappointed, if I don't get a small plate of them with my wanton soup.

answered by
0 votes

Yes, we use bean sprouts quite often in cooking. Note that it's mung beans, we Vietnamese don't like soy beans.

image

answered by
0 votes

When it comes to vegetables, Vietnam takes pole position over Asian cuisine, nowhere are fresh vegetables so visible and revered - and bean sprouts are a part of the culinary wizardry of Vietnam. It is one of the most popular vegetables, providing the “sound of eating’.

Vietnamese cuisine is renowned for being diverse, healthy, and delicious, with the perfect harmony of vegetables and spices; the cuisine is renowned for the use of only fresh ingredients (no dried herbs and chili flakes here) for the nutritious value of the meals, maintaining a healthy approach towards wholesome food.

image

Vietnamese bean sprout salad - dua gia - is a joy to eat - combining springy carrot shreds and crunchy bean sprouts with a light dressing of savoury sauce mixed with fish sauce, vinegar, rice wine, sugar.

Bean sprouts add the crunch to Pho - taking its rightful place among the sliced onion, scallion, Thai basil, cilantro, chilli, Sorrel Rau Chua (sourish French Sorrel), etc. - the mix of fresh greens is like a salad. Wonderful complement.

image

Just like banh mi , Bánh xèo (literally "sizzling pancake"), has a bit of French influence. It’s a crepe and oyster omelette fold into one crispy savoury snack. Choose your ingredients of shrimp, pork belly and onions, then throw in a handful of lightly blanched bean sprouts - would you leave out the music?

image

answered by
DesignsShirt
Design your Own Team Apparel